A New Option to Learn about Bariatric Surgery

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital January 29, 2015

If your body mass index (BMI) is greater than 40 or greater than 35 and you have co-morbid conditions, you may be a candidate for bariatric surgery.

If losing weight and improving your health continually top your list of New Year’s resolutions, it may be time to consider new strategies.

The Center for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital is a multidisciplinary center offering laparoscopic weight loss surgery options. If your body mass index (BMI) is greater than 40 or greater than 35 and you have co-morbid conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease, you may be a candidate for bariatric surgery.

Attending a New Patient Information Session is the first step in considering whether bariatric surgery makes sense for you. At the one-hour information session, our surgeons and team members will introduce you to the bariatric surgery program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. You will learn about the types of surgical procedures that are available; nutrition and lifestyle changes that are necessary before and after surgery; insurance and financial issues related to bariatric surgery; and how to take next steps.

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Chronicling the Journey to Bariatric Surgery

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital January 21, 2014

Emily Bell, 43, has made the decision to seek surgical treatment for her obesity.

Today’s post is written by BWH patient Emily Bell, a 43-year-old woman who has made the decision to seek surgical treatment for her obesity. Emily will be blogging about her experience throughout her journey to better health.

A couple of months ago, I had lunch with a friend I hadn’t seen in more than a year. We were once in Weight Watchers together, and neither of us was new to weight loss. We’ve shared the tribulations of “keeping it off” and commiserated over the way we’ve dieted our hearts out and always gained the weight back.

When I saw her recently, I noticed that my friend had lost weight again. “What have you been eating …” I trailed off, realizing that her body wasn’t just smaller. Something was different. I changed my question. “How did this happen?”

She answered in a dramatic stage whisper. “I got the surgery.”

It took me a minute to figure out what she meant. I frowned. “Obesity surgery? Really? But that’s …” In my mind it was like admitting failure. Except my friend isn’t a failure. She’s a highly functional, social, confident, and intelligent woman. I asked, “What procedure did you have?”

“Gastric sleeve,” she said with a wink and a nod.

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