Select Our Next BRIght Futures Prize Winner!

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital October 14, 2016

Would you like to choose the direction of medical research? Select our next BRIght Futures Prize winner! The BRIght Futures Prizes support investigators across the Brigham Research Institute (BRI) as they work to answer challenging questions and solve grand problems in medicine. This year’s finalists, all Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers and clinicians, were selected through a rigorous two-step scientific review process. Their projects include an innovative home hospital concept, a new way to predict and treat Alzheimer’s disease, and a novel ultrasound device for ulcerative colitis.

Your vote will help decide which of this year’s three finalists will receive the $100,000 research prize. To participate, watch the video below, read the Q&A with the finalists, and then cast your vote. The winner will be announced on November 10, 2016 at Discover Brigham. This event is free and open to the public. All are welcome to attend!

 

 

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Inflammatory Bowel Disease – A New Model of Care

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital April 28, 2015

Dr. Joshua Korzenik

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which affects about 1.6 to 1.8 million Americans, is a group of chronic conditions that impacts the colon and small intestine. The two main types of IBD are Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Both conditions affect the large intestine, but Crohn’s also can affect the entire digestive tract.

IBD is a lifelong condition that can cause a variety of unpleasant symptoms, including diarrhea, vomiting, pain, and fatigue. There are, however, treatments that can help patients manage these symptoms and make life more comfortable.

In the following video, Dr. Joshua Korzenik, Director of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Crohn’s and Colitis Center, discusses the major causes of IBD, innovative treatment approaches, and what’s being done to improve IBD care.

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Countdown to the New Year – Top Ten Posts for 2014

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital December 31, 2014

The blog team at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) is counting down to the New Year by revisiting our top 10 blog posts published in 2014, beginning with number ten. We’d also love to hear from you – what were your favorites? Thank you for your comments, questions, and continued interest in HealthHub. We wish you a healthy and happy New Year.

#10 – Video – Comprehensive Spine Care

Certain spinal conditions, such as back pain, are very common. However, treating these conditions can require the expertise and coordination of more than one medical specialty. Often, the first step is conservative, non-operative treatment by physiatrists, pain management physicians, and other specialists. Learn how our surgical and non-surgical spine specialists collaborate on care for patients with spinal disorders.

#9 – Improving Joint Replacement:  Consultation through Recovery

Based on the work of the Care Improvement Team, led by orthopedic surgeon Dr. John Wright, Brigham and Women’s Hospital uses a standardized approach to total knee replacement that guides how patients should be treated, from the time they arrive at the hospital for a consultation to the care they receive after discharge. This process has improved patient outcomes.

#8 – Colorectal Cancer: Do Men and Women Have Different Symptoms

Risk factors for colorectal cancer — which include age, family history of the disease, or having Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis — are similar for men and women. However, lifestyle choices that may impact the risk can differ between men and women. These include obesity, lack of physical activity, low vitamin D, and consuming a high amount of red meat.

 

#7 – Should You Go without Gluten?

Many people are becoming increasingly concerned about eating foods containing gluten. Gluten is responsible for the reaction that damages the lining of the small intestine in celiac disease. It also has been linked to less serious gastrointestinal complaints, such as diarrhea and bloating. Read more about how gluten can affect your health and the benefits of avoiding it.

 

#6 – Keys to Preventing Lyme Disease

Dr. Nancy Shadick, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), and her team have developed entertaining, interactive programs to increase people’s knowledge about Lyme disease, the consequences of the disease, and prevention techniques. Play the game to learn how you can prevent Lyme disease, a tick-borne infection that can cause neurological and joint problems.

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7 Myths about Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital April 8, 2014

The underlying cause of IBD is biological, not emotional.

Authors: Dr. Joshua Korzenik, Director of the Crohn’s and Colitis Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), along with Michael Currier PA-C, Beth-Ann Norton NP, and Annie Coe RN.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes two types of diseases: ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. As the name suggests, these diseases involve inflammation in the upper (esophagus, stomach and small intestine) or lower (colon) gastrointestinal tract. IBD may be confused with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which shares similar symptoms but is a completely different disorder. Patients with IBS do not have inflammation in the intestines. There is no cure for IBD, but proper care and treatment can help patients minimize the symptoms and prevent complications.

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What You Need to Know: Understanding Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital April 7, 2014

Dr. Joshua Korzenik

Today’s post was written by Dr. Joshua Korzenik, Director of the Crohn’s and Colitis Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, along with Michael Currier PA-C, Beth-Ann Norton NP, and Annie Coe RN, also members of the Crohn’s and Colitis Center.                       

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes two types of diseases: ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. As the name suggests, these diseases involve inflammation in the upper (esophagus, stomach, and small intestines) or lower (colon) gastrointestinal tract. IBD may be confused with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which shares similar symptoms but is a completely different disorder. Patients with IBS do not have inflammation in the intestines. There is no cure for IBD, but proper care and treatment can help patients minimize the symptoms and prevent complications.

IBD: A Common and Debilitating Disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a fairly common condition. There are estimated to be more than one million people in the United States with these diseases, split equally between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Read More »