New Brigham and Women’s Hospital research suggests that certain heart failure patients may extend their life by switching medications.

BWH research suggests that certain heart failure patients may extend their life by switching medications.

Contributor: Scott D. Solomon, MD is Director of Noninvasive Cardiology and Edward D. Frohlich Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Pathophysiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. His interests include cardiovascular disease and heart failure.

New Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) research suggests that certain heart failure patients may extend their life by switching medications. The BWH-led study finds that patients with reduced ejection fraction (reduced ability to pump blood from the heart) can expect to live one-and-a-half to two years longer when treated with sacubitril-valsartan instead of enalapril, the current standard of care in heart failure.

Heart failure, the leading cause of hospitalization for Americans over the age of 65, accounts for more than one million hospitalizations in the U.S. each year. About half of the nearly six million Americans living with heart failure have the reduced ejection fraction form of the disease, which bears a significantly increased risk for future cardiac events and death.

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