Five Tips for a Healthy Rotator Cuff

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital December 9, 2014

Throwing athletes use their shoulders aggressively and are at increased risk of rotator cuff damage.

Contributor: Elizabeth G. Matzkin, MD, is Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics.

The rotator cuff is composed of four muscles surrounding the shoulder joint. They act like cables on a suspension bridge to coordinate movement of the shoulder in space and to enhance the stability of the shoulder joint. Injury to this important group of muscles can cause pain and limit shoulder function. Non-sports activities can cause such injuries, but throwing athletes use their shoulders aggressively and are at increased risk of rotator cuff damage.

Simple everyday measures, however, can significantly improve the health of the rotator cuff and prevent future injuries. Dr. Elizabeth G. Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at BWH and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, offers patients the following five simple tips for maintaining a healthy rotator cuff.

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Are you Knock-kneed or Bowlegged?

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital February 27, 2014

Women have a greater chance of becoming knock-kneed, due to their typically wider hips.

Author: Nicole Durand PT, DPT, a physical therapist at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) Department of Rehabilitation, 850 Boylston St, Chestnut Hill, MA.

Knock-kneed  and bowlegged are terms used to describe an individual’s gait or stance. A person who is knock-kneed has a medical condition known as a valgus deformity, an outward rotation of the tibia on the femur. Bowlegged describes a medical condition known as a varus deformity, an inward rotation of the tibia, resulting in a leg that appears bowed out. Both conditions can lead to misalignments of the hip or knee, potentially causing injury and knee pain. Taking the proper precautions and preparing yourself and your joints for your sport or desired workout can help prevent injury.
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