Join Us to Learn about the Latest in Prostate Cancer

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital August 9, 2016

D'Amico blog

Dr. Anthony D’Amico, Chief of the Genitourinary Oncology Program at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, is one of the featured speakers at the Annual Symposium on Prostate Cancer.

Would you like to learn about the latest in prostate cancer prevention, detection, and treatment? Join prostate cancer experts from Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center at the 18th Annual Symposium on Prostate Cancer on the evening of Wednesday, September 7, 2016 in Newton, Massachusetts. (See below to register.)

Featured speakers will include Dr. Anthony D’Amico, Chief of the Genitourinary Radiation Oncology Program at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center; Dr. Mary-Ellen Taplin, Director of Clinical Research for the Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center; Dr. Adam Kibel, Chief of Urologic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, and Dr. Jerome Richie, Chief of Urologic Surgery (Emeritus) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center.

Our team of pioneering, nationally and internationally prominent specialists will discuss:

  • Prevention with lifestyle modifications, including diet and exercise
  • Controversies about early detection and screening using PSA and other novel biomarkers
  • Surgical and radiation approaches, including newer less invasive techniques and procedures
  • Prostate cancer staging
  • Novel treatment for advanced prostate cancer
  • Management of side effects of prostate cancer treatment

PLEASE NOTE THAT REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED TO ATTEND THIS EVENT. To register, please call us at 1-877-DFCI-BWH or register online.

Related links:

Men’s Health – What You Should Know 

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 7, 2016

June is Men’s Health Month, a time to address important health issues that impact men’s lives. Read the stories below to learn the latest about prostate cancer, testosterone therapy, erectile dysfunction, and other factors that affect men’s physical and mental health.

Healthy-Men-1Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer May Increase Risk of Depression

A Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) study has found a significant association between depression and patients being treated for localized prostate cancer with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). When compared to patients who did not receive ADT, patients who received ADT had higher incidences of depression and inpatient and outpatient psychiatric treatment.

 

Healthy-Men-2Testosterone’s Effect on the Heart and Quality of Life

Testosterone use among men doesn’t appear to increase their risk of developing atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), a critical risk factor for heart attack and stroke. However, research also shows that men using testosterone fail to realize the quality of life benefits that are often the primary goals of testosterone therapy.

 

Healthy-Men-3Treatment Options for Erectile Dysfunction

Age, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease contribute to a higher risk of erectile dysfunction (ED), which affects about one half of American men over age 40 at some point in their lives. Most men experiencing ED respond to nonsurgical treatments, such as oral medications or self-injection therapy. However, if these treatments don’t work, surgery may provide another option.

 

Healthy-Men-4Breakfast Makes a Man’s Heart Healthy

Research shows that men who skip breakfast have a 27 percent higher risk of suffering a heart attack or developing heart disease than those who start the day with something in their stomach. These men who forego breakfast also indulge more heavily in other unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as smoking, exercising less, and drinking alcohol regularly.

 

Healthy-Men-5Prostate Cancer Screening – Who Recommends PSA Testing?

BWH-led research finds that a patient’s likelihood of getting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for the early detection of prostate cancer depends on the type of physician he sees. According to the study’s lead author, the findings highlight the need for physicians to reach a broader consensus on the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening and the importance of patients discussing their care options with their physicians.

10 Essential Health Screenings for Men

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 3, 2014

Every man should have their blood pressure checked regularly. This can be done at the doctor’s office or at home.

Detecting symptoms of certain health conditions early, when they are more easily treatable, is a critical factor in helping men stay healthy. That’s why getting all your doctor-recommended health care screenings in a timely fashion is the kind of to-do list that no man should ignore.

Below is information about ten important health screenings for men, including the appropriate timing for each

1. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

Men between the ages of 65 and 75 who have ever smoked tobacco should get screened for an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An imaging test, such as a computed tomography (CT) scan, ultrasound, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study, can help determine the presence, size, and extent of an aortic aneurysm. The major risk of this aortic bulging is a rupture resulting in severe or fatal internal bleeding.

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Understanding High-Risk Prostate Cancer

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital February 6, 2014

High-risk prostate cancer is less likely to be cured using standard therapies alone and is often seen in younger men.

The American Cancer Society estimates that approximately one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime. In fact, prostate cancer remains one of the most common cancers worldwide.

Many men have slow-growing prostate cancer and are successfully treated with current surgical or radiation therapies. But, there is a smaller number with high-risk prostate cancer, which has a much higher chance of returning and spreading after treatment. High-risk prostate cancer is less likely to be cured using standard therapies alone and is often seen in younger men.

“We have devoted a lot of time to studying high-risk prostate cancer to design strategies that are aimed at improving cure rates for this disease,” says Dr. Mary-Ellen Taplin, Director of Clinical Research in the Center for Genitourinary Oncology at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center.

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Prostate Cancer Education Center Offers Comprehensive Information

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 4, 2013

Patient education is an important tool in the fight against prostate cancer.

With about one man in six being diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime, there’s a great need for patient education. This is why Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) has developed the Prostate Cancer Education Center at brighamandwomens.org  — providing comprehensive information on prostate cancer, including:

Prostate cancer is the second most common and deadly cancer among American men, with nearly 29,000 dying from the disease each year. However, the five-year survival rate for men diagnosed with prostate cancer has increased from 67 percent to 99 percent in only the past 20 years.

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Prostate Cancer Screening – A Guide for Men

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital September 19, 2012

Troy Brown

Patriots Hall of Famer Troy Brown gets a free PSA screening at the Brigham and Women's/Mass General Health Care Center.

Prostate cancer is the second most common and deadly cancer among
American men. About 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime, and about 1 in 33 men will die from the disease.

The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test is an important tool for helping to diagnose, monitor, and guide the treatment of this disease. Since the introduction of PSA screening more than 20 years ago, along with the advent of more aggressive treatment, there has been a dramatic increase in the survival rate of U.S. men diagnosed with prostate cancer. This includes, according to a recent study, a significant move toward resolving the disparity between prostate cancer survival rates in African-American men and Caucasian men.

Opinions on when a PSA screening should be performed, or whether it should be performed at all, vary widely among health care professionals. Brigham and Women’s Hospital continues to advocate the selective use of PSA. We believe that, overall, the benefits of PSA screening greatly outweigh the risks, particularly for young and/or healthy men at high risk and when prostate cancer specialists – oncologists and urologists – are interpreting the results to effectively limit unnecessary treatment.

Below is some important information for men who are considering PSA screening.

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Prostate Cancer Screening – Should I or Shouldn’t I?

Posted by Blog Administrator May 7, 2012

Should you get a prostate cancer screening? It depends on who you ask or what you read.

While one research study shows that the benefit of prostate cancer screening is significant, another study finds little, if any, benefit. And while one expert defends the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test – which measures levels of the PSA protein in the blood – another just as passionately dismisses it. With studies, experts, and news stories disseminating such widely varying viewpoints, it’s easy to understand why men and their loved ones would feel confused – and wonder how to arrive at an informed decision.

Start by asking an expert.

Dr. Anthony D’Amico, Professor and Chief of Genitourinary Radiation Oncology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Chief of the Prostate Cancer Radiation Oncology Service at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, has been treating prostate cancer for more than 20 years and continues to be a firm advocate of prostate cancer screening, particularly for younger men. “PSA screening is effective in decreasing cancer death,” says D’Amico. “It’s a critical tool for having an informed conversation with a man about whether he needs treatment or not.”

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