At BWH, DBS electrode placement is performed in the AMIGO Suite, which enables magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to be obtained directly in the operating room.

Imaging in the AMIGO Suite at Brigham and Women’s Hospital enables patients who are candidates for DBS to have this procedure performed under general anesthesia.

For some people with movement disorders like Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor, deep brain stimulation (DBS) can offer an effective treatment for symptoms that are not responding to medications. The traditional procedure to place the DBS electrodes, however, has required patients to remain awake during surgery. Patients who are candidates for DBS may now have this procedure performed under general anesthesia.

“This is a huge advance for patients opting for DBS,” said Dr. G. Rees Cosgrove, Director of Epilepsy and Functional Neurosurgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), the only hospital in New England and one of few nationwide to offer asleep DBS. “The imaging that we use while we perform the procedure enables us to confirm that we’ve reached the exact locations that we are trying to target in the brain while we are in the operating room, without the need to keep patients awake.”

At BWH, DBS electrode placement is performed in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) Suite, which enables images, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to be obtained directly in the operating room. During surgery in AMIGO, MRI is used to guide placement of DBS electrodes and confirm the targets to reduce symptoms without adversely affecting language or other key areas.

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