Top Ten HealthHub Posts in 2015 – Share Your Favorite

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital December 31, 2015

We crunched the numbers and the results are in:  the most-viewed HealthHub posts published in 2015. This year’s list includes a wide range of topics, from a diet that may promote longevity to 3-D printing of blood vessels needed for organ regeneration. Share your favorite with family, friends, and followers. We wish you a healthy New Year!

 

#1 – New Evidence that Mediterranean Diet May Lead to Longer Life

2015-1

BWH researchers have found that following a Mediterranean diet may lead to a longer life .  The findings are based on the study of telomeres, the repetitive DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes, which are a reliable biomarker of human aging. The researchers found that greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with longer telomeres.

 

#2 – Top 10 Health Care Innovations for 2015

2015-2Innovations that increase patient engagement, reduce costs, and advance digital health technology were voted among the most important innovations for 2015 by physicians, researchers, and other members of the health care community. Learn how big data, telehealth, wearables, apps, and other innovations will transform health care in the future.

 

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New Evidence that a Mediterranean Diet May Lead to a Longer Life

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital January 8, 2015

Researchers have found that sticking to a Mediterranean diet may lead to a longer life.

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) have found that sticking to a Mediterranean diet may lead to a longer life.

The findings are based on the study of telomeres, the repetitive DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes. These chromosome tips get shorter every time a cell divides, and their length is a reliable biomarker (biological indicator) of aging in humans. Shorter telomeres have been associated with an increased risk of aging-related diseases (particularly cardiovascular diseases) and a decrease in life expectancy, while longer telomeres, correspondingly, have been linked with longevity.

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Mediterranean Diet May Lead to Longer, Healthier Lives for Women

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital May 15, 2014

Middle-aged women who follow a heart-healthy Mediterranean diet may live a healthier, longer life.

A few months ago, Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) researchers released a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine that indicates middle-aged women who follow a heart-healthy Mediterranean diet may live a healthier, longer life.

“Women with healthier dietary patterns at midlife were 40 percent more likely to survive to age 70 or over,” says lead researcher Cecilia Samieri, a postdoctoral fellow who conducted the study while at BWH. She is now a researcher at INSERM and Universite de Bordeaux, in France – the French equivalent of the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

The women who ate healthier not only lived longer, but they also thrived. They were less likely to have any major chronic diseases and more likely to have no impairment in physical functioning, mental health, or thinking skills. The research did not, however, prove a cause-and-effect link between better eating and longer life.

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Improving Your Health the Mediterranean Way

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital April 30, 2013

Think of the Mediterranean to inspire healthy eating.

With its abundance of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, olive oil, and fish, the Mediterranean diet has been linked to a multitude of health benefits, including reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and better weight control.

Unlike some restrictive dieting approaches, the Mediterranean diet encourages inclusion rather than exclusion. However, the Mediterranean diet goes beyond food selections. It also hinges on attitudes towards eating and food.

Cultures adopting the Mediterranean approach generally care deeply about their food and are mindful when they eat, taking time to enjoy the taste and satisfaction of the meal. This is in stark contrast to the typical American diet, where consumption of meals tends to be done quickly and without much thought, which also can result in overeating and weight gain.

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