Men’s Sexual Health: Five Things You Need to Know

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital October 28, 2016

Understanding how sexual health issues are caused, diagnosed, and treated can help men restore sexual function and regain confidence in their sex lives.

There are a number of sexual health issues among men that can interfere with a satisfying sex life, including erectile dysfunction, problems with ejaculation, infertility and others. The following sexual health problems are common among men and are routinely evaluated and treated at the Men’s Health Center at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital, which was recently established to meet a growing demand to address male reproduction and sexual health concerns.

#1: The most common male sexual health problem is Erectile Dysfunction (ED).

Erectile Dysfunction (ED), a difficulty obtaining or maintaining an erection firm enough for sex, affects 50 percent of American men over the age of 40. ED, or impotence, is mainly caused by blood flow problems such as high blood pressure or vascular disease, which are common among aging men. Other factors that increase the risk for developing ED include surgeries involving prostate cancer, smoking, certain medications and the use of alcohol or drugs.

According to Dr. Michael O’Leary, director of BWH Men’s Health Center at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital, many of the first-line agents for the treatment of ED involve medications that work for 50-70 percent of men. If a patient does not respond to medication, several non-surgical options exist to encourage an erection by promoting blood flow. Read More »

The Other Half of the Fertility Equation: Male Fertility

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 10, 2013

Don't forget the other half of the fertility equation - male fertility.

Today’s post was written by Dr. Elena Yanushpolsky, an infertility specialist with the Center for Infertility and Reproductive Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). Dr. Yanushpolsky is also the Director of the BWH Center for Infertility and Reproductive Surgery at South Shore Hospital in South Weymouth.

A couple, both about 33 years old, recently came to my clinic after trying to conceive for 18 months without success. After evaluating both of them, we learned that their inability to conceive was due to the husband’s infertility. This couple’s situation is not unusual. In 20-25 percent of cases, infertility can be attributed exclusively to male factor problems, and an additional 10 percent of couples have male infertility in addition to other factors.

The first step in evaluating whether male infertility is a factor is a detailed health history. Once adequate sexual performance has been confirmed, the next step is a semen analysis. This test measures several characteristics of a man’s sperm, including the number of sperm (volume and concentration), the shape of the sperm (morphology), and the ability of sperm to move (motility). If the results of the semen analysis are abnormal, the test is repeated in three to four weeks. If the second test is abnormal, a man will be referred to a urologist for further evaluation.

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