Facing Gynecologic Surgery While Experiencing Infertility

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital April 21, 2015

Antonio Gargiulo, MD, Medical Director, Center for Robotic Surgery

Today’s post is written by Antonio Gargiulo, MD, Medical Director, Center for Robotic Surgery and a fertility expert in the Center for Infertility and Reproductive Surgery (CIRS) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Massachusetts and the Center for Reproductive Care at Exeter Hospital in New Hampshire.

Often my patients experiencing infertility need gynecologic surgery because certain conditions can either cause infertility or impair infertility treatments. Most of these conditions can be treated through minimally invasive surgical techniques, resulting in fewer complications and quicker recovery.

The following post provides information about conditions requiring gynecologic surgery and your treatment options. I recommend that all women of reproductive age that need gynecologic surgery should consult a reproductive surgeon (infertility specialists who practice gynecologic surgery). These physicians have received highly specialized surgical training, which is critical in successfully treating gynecologic conditions that may affect your fertility. I also remind patients that obtaining a second opinion before agreeing to any surgical plan is an essential step in their care.

Read More »

Alternative Treatments for Infertility

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital January 15, 2015

Studies show that acupuncture has a placebo effect in improving pregnancy rates during IVF cycles.

Authors: Elena Yanushpolsky, MD, is an infertility specialist with the Center for Infertility and Reproductive Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). Dr. Yanushpolsky is also the Director of the BWH’s Center for Infertility and Reproductive Surgery at South Shore Hospital in South Weymouth.

When conventional fertility treatments do not result in successful pregnancies, couples suffering from infertility often search for alternative or complementary treatment options. Before considering these complementary treatments, it’s essential that patients have a good understanding of the associated risks and benefits, and overall effectiveness, much as they would with conventional therapies.

Read More »

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome: What You Need to Know

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital August 21, 2014

There are a number of treatment options for women with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

Author: Dr. Rachel Ashby, Director of the Donor Egg and Gestational Carrier Program at the Center for Infertility and Reproductive Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) affects between five and ten percent of women. This common endocrine disorder can cause disruption in ovulatory and menstrual cycles, as well as an excess production of male type hormones, all of which can cause infertility. The cause of PCOS is likely a combination of genetic and environmental factors. There is a twenty to forty percent incidence of PCOS in women where either a mother or sister has also been diagnosed with the disorder.

Read More »

IVF Helps Deliver a Gift worth Waiting For

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital October 29, 2013

Leah Miriam Urovitch was born on March 30, 2013, healthy and one day ahead of schedule.

Leah Miriam Urovitch was born on March 30, 2013, healthy and one day ahead of schedule. But her parents, Josh, 45, and Lisa, 43, had been waiting for this little girl for years.

Josh and Lisa were married in 2009, and, because of their ages, they started trying to have a baby right away. They continued trying to conceive naturally for more than a year before deciding to seek professional help.

In 2011, they reached out to Dr. Elena Yanushpolsky, an infertility specialist with the Center for Infertility and Reproductive Surgery (CIRS) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). At that point, the primary options for Josh and Lisa were intrauterine insemination (IUI) treatments or in vitro fertilization (IVF).

For IUI, the male partner’s sperm is collected and then injected into the female partner, usually on two consecutive days at the time of ovulation. IVF, on the other hand, is a more involved process and can be broken down into four steps: using medications to stimulate the ovaries to produce multiple mature eggs; surgically removing the eggs; fertilizing and incubating the eggs; and returning the eggs to the uterus by means of a catheter.

Read More »

Is Robotic Surgery Here to Stay?

Posted by Blog Administrator March 2, 2012

Dr. Antonio Gargiulo; Sophia, Anna, and David Watson

Dr. Antonio Gargiulo; Sophia, Anna, and David Watson

Technological innovation can be intoxicating. We’re fascinated by the ability to do something that we’ve never done before – to start a faucet without touching a handle, to take a picture without using film, or to accumulate hundreds of friends without the hassle of talking to them.

But it’s a whole new ballgame when new technology becomes a part of the health care decision-making process. We’re no longer talking about matters of enhanced convenience or new forms of amusement. We’re talking about our bodies, our minds, and perhaps our mortality, and, thus, our fascination becomes tempered by uncertainty. We’re enticed by the potential advantages that a new technology can bring, but we’re also comforted by the reliability of medical practices that are tried and true.

Read More »