An Alternative “Approach” to Hip Replacement Surgery

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital January 13, 2017

Dr. Gregory Brick and Dr. John Ready are experienced in using the anterior approach in hip replacements, a technique that has demonstrated reduced length of hospital stay, less risk of dislocation, faster recovery, and less post-operative pain.

Contributors: Dr. Gregory Brick and Dr. John Edward Ready are orthopaedic surgeons in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). Dr. James D. Kang is Chairman of the Department.

Orthopaedic surgeons have several ways of reaching the hip joint during a hip replacement surgery. The traditional technique, known as the “posterior” approach, reaches the hip joint through the buttock muscles. Less commonly used is the “anterior” approach, which makes a small incision at the front of the hip. Only 15 percent of surgeons in the U.S. employ the anterior approach, and few surgeons in Boston use the method.

Currently, the only surgeons in the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency Program to use the anterior approach are Dr. Gregory Brick and Dr. John Edward Ready – orthopaedic surgeons in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at BWH. They use the anterior approach in 95 percent of their hip replacement surgeries.     Read More »

Hip-Spine Syndrome: It’s Complicated (and Often Overlooked)

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital November 18, 2016

A patient with hip arthritis may experience hip or groin pain as well as trouble walking, while a patient with lumbar spinal stenosis may have pain down their leg, or neurologic symptoms such as numbness, tingling or weakness.

3d rendered illustration of a man having backache

Hip-spine syndrome is a condition where both hip and spine problems are occurring in tandem.

“Hip-spine syndrome is a distinct syndrome where both hip and spinal problems are occurring together,” said James D. Kang, MD, Chairman of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH).

And yet, because hip and spine disorders have overlapping presentations and symptoms, it can often be challenging for physicians to determine if a patient’s symptoms originate from the hip, spine or both. This can delay diagnosis and treatment, and many patients with hip-spine syndrome have seen several physicians and therapists, or may have undergone various procedures that did not relieve their pain. Read More »