Top Ten HealthHub Posts in 2015 – Share Your Favorite

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital December 31, 2015

We crunched the numbers and the results are in:  the most-viewed HealthHub posts published in 2015. This year’s list includes a wide range of topics, from a diet that may promote longevity to 3-D printing of blood vessels needed for organ regeneration. Share your favorite with family, friends, and followers. We wish you a healthy New Year!

 

#1 – New Evidence that Mediterranean Diet May Lead to Longer Life

2015-1

BWH researchers have found that following a Mediterranean diet may lead to a longer life .  The findings are based on the study of telomeres, the repetitive DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes, which are a reliable biomarker of human aging. The researchers found that greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with longer telomeres.

 

#2 – Top 10 Health Care Innovations for 2015

2015-2Innovations that increase patient engagement, reduce costs, and advance digital health technology were voted among the most important innovations for 2015 by physicians, researchers, and other members of the health care community. Learn how big data, telehealth, wearables, apps, and other innovations will transform health care in the future.

 

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Heart Attack: Would You Recognize the Warning Signs?

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital August 27, 2015

Dr. Kevin Croce, interventional cardiologist

When Boston-area resident Dana Mower sat down in 2015 to watch Save My Life: Boston Trauma, a medical documentary series about trauma patients treated at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and two other hospitals, he had no idea he would become part of the story about a man having a heart attack.

The program featured a man who was taken to BWH after experiencing symptoms of severe heartburn and indigestion while visiting with his daughter at nearby Boston Children’s Hospital. Diagnostic tests indicated Manny Couto’s symptoms were due to a heart attack, not indigestion. Dr. Kevin Croce, an interventional cardiologist, immediately took Manny to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, where he and his team performed a heart catheterization procedure. During this procedure, Dr. Croce used a small catheter inserted into Manny’s arm to go up to the heart to remove a clot and place a stent to open the blocked artery, restoring normal heart blood flow.

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