Men’s Sexual Health: Five Things You Need to Know

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital October 28, 2016

Understanding how sexual health issues are caused, diagnosed, and treated can help men restore sexual function and regain confidence in their sex lives.

There are a number of sexual health issues among men that can interfere with a satisfying sex life, including erectile dysfunction, problems with ejaculation, infertility and others. The following sexual health problems are common among men and are routinely evaluated and treated at the Men’s Health Center at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital, which was recently established to meet a growing demand to address male reproduction and sexual health concerns.

#1: The most common male sexual health problem is Erectile Dysfunction (ED).

Erectile Dysfunction (ED), a difficulty obtaining or maintaining an erection firm enough for sex, affects 50 percent of American men over the age of 40. ED, or impotence, is mainly caused by blood flow problems such as high blood pressure or vascular disease, which are common among aging men. Other factors that increase the risk for developing ED include surgeries involving prostate cancer, smoking, certain medications and the use of alcohol or drugs.

According to Dr. Michael O’Leary, director of BWH Men’s Health Center at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital, many of the first-line agents for the treatment of ED involve medications that work for 50-70 percent of men. If a patient does not respond to medication, several non-surgical options exist to encourage an erection by promoting blood flow. Read More »

Men’s Health – What You Should Know 

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 7, 2016

June is Men’s Health Month, a time to address important health issues that impact men’s lives. Read the stories below to learn the latest about prostate cancer, testosterone therapy, erectile dysfunction, and other factors that affect men’s physical and mental health.

Healthy-Men-1Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer May Increase Risk of Depression

A Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) study has found a significant association between depression and patients being treated for localized prostate cancer with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). When compared to patients who did not receive ADT, patients who received ADT had higher incidences of depression and inpatient and outpatient psychiatric treatment.

 

Healthy-Men-2Testosterone’s Effect on the Heart and Quality of Life

Testosterone use among men doesn’t appear to increase their risk of developing atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), a critical risk factor for heart attack and stroke. However, research also shows that men using testosterone fail to realize the quality of life benefits that are often the primary goals of testosterone therapy.

 

Healthy-Men-3Treatment Options for Erectile Dysfunction

Age, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease contribute to a higher risk of erectile dysfunction (ED), which affects about one half of American men over age 40 at some point in their lives. Most men experiencing ED respond to nonsurgical treatments, such as oral medications or self-injection therapy. However, if these treatments don’t work, surgery may provide another option.

 

Healthy-Men-4Breakfast Makes a Man’s Heart Healthy

Research shows that men who skip breakfast have a 27 percent higher risk of suffering a heart attack or developing heart disease than those who start the day with something in their stomach. These men who forego breakfast also indulge more heavily in other unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as smoking, exercising less, and drinking alcohol regularly.

 

Healthy-Men-5Prostate Cancer Screening – Who Recommends PSA Testing?

BWH-led research finds that a patient’s likelihood of getting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for the early detection of prostate cancer depends on the type of physician he sees. According to the study’s lead author, the findings highlight the need for physicians to reach a broader consensus on the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening and the importance of patients discussing their care options with their physicians.

Medication and More: Options for Treating Erectile Dysfunction

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital December 4, 2014

Erectile dysfunction (ED) affects about one half of American men over age 40 at some point in their lives.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) describes the inability to achieve or maintain an erection that is firm enough for sexual function. This condition affects about one half of American men over age 40 at some point in their lives. Factors that contribute to a higher risk of ED include age, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease. Most men respond to non-surgical treatments, such as oral medications or self-injection therapy. If these treatments don’t work, surgery may provide another option.

Dr. Michael O’Leary, director of the Men’s Sexual Health Clinic at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, focuses primarily on men who are dealing with ED and offers a variety of treatments based on each patient’s specific needs. In this video, Dr. O’Leary explains the causes of ED and how it can be effectively treated.

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What to Do When the Blue Pill Doesn’t Come Through

Posted by Blog Administrator April 11, 2012

Couple concerned about erectile dysfunction

What can couples do when oral treatments for erectile dysfunction fail?

Judging by the ads for Viagra, Levitra, and other oral treatments for erectile dysfunction (ED), taking one of these pills will soon have you and your partner laughing and holding hands on the beach. But, alas, these pills don’t work for every man.

The goal of these medications, also known as PDE5 inhibitors, is to increase blood flow, but they only work in about 50 percent of men with ED. That leaves about two million American men looking for another solution – or simply giving up.

When ED medications work, men are very satisfied. This success has certainly helped to bring ED out of the shadows, but only partially. A recent U.S. study found that nearly 75 percent of men with erectile dysfunction were too embarrassed to discuss the problem with their physician.

Read More »