Advance in 3D Printing May Make Organ Creation a Reality

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital March 19, 2014

The image above demonstrates how a micro-robot (black square) can be used to arrange cell blocks (colored shapes) into structures.

Tissue engineering and 3D printing have become vitally important to the future of medicine for many reasons. The shortage of available organs for transplantation, for example, leaves many patients on lengthy waiting lists for life-saving treatment. Being able to engineer organs using a patient’s own cells can not only alleviate this shortage, but also address issues related to rejection of donated organs.

Developing therapies and testing drugs is another challenge for many researchers, as current models have limitations in reliability and predictability. “Tissue engineering provides a more practical means for researchers to study cell behavior, like cancer cell resistance to therapy, and test new drugs or combinations of drugs to treat many diseases,” explains Dr. Savas Tasoglu, research fellow in the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) Division of Renal Medicine.

Read More »

2013 BRIght Futures Prize: Promoting Innovative Medical Research

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital October 15, 2013

Dr. Robert C. Green, winner of the first BRIght Futures Prize.

Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) is routinely recognized as one of the top academic medical centers in the country. Last year, the BWH Biomedical Research Institute launched the annual $100,000 BRIght Futures Prize competition to support innovative research that is both compelling and promising to an audience that extends beyond just scientists. The competition is intended to generate excitement and motivation within the research community, while heightening the visibility of BWH research worldwide. It supports researchers as they work to answer provocative questions and better meet today’s medical needs.

The three finalists were selected through a rigorous two-step peer review process, and the winner will be determined by public voting. The public is encouraged to vote for their favorite research project by visiting bwhresearchday.partners.org. The winner will be announced during the awards ceremonies at the 2nd annual BWH Research Day on November 21. This event has the same goal of raising awareness and celebrating research at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Registration is open not only to internal employees, but any individuals interested in learning more about the comprehensive science that goes on at the institution every day. Patients, local scientists, health care professionals, and industry collaborators all come together to interact with and learn more from BWH investigators and clinicians. Topics of focus this year include technology and innovation, personalized medicine, neuro-degeneration, and allergies, among others.

Read More »