Recognizing American Heart Month

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital February 9, 2016

heart-stethoscope
Heart disease remains the leading cause of death among both men and women in the United States, but many advances are being made in the fight against heart disease. In recognition of American Heart Month, we have compiled videos from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) Heart & Vascular Center experts to provide you with information on many of the latest approaches in heart disease treatment and prevention.

Targeting Inflammation– A Key to Preventing Heart Disease

Research led by Dr. Paul Ridker, Director of the BWH Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, determined that people with higher blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a measure of inflammation, are at increased risk of having a heart attack or stroke in the future. In this video, Dr. Ridker discusses the role of inflammation in heart disease.

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What Is Cardiac Amyloidosis?

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 23, 2015

The green areas in the picture above represent a buildup of amyloid in the heart of a patient with senile amyloidosis.

Cardiac amyloidosis is a dangerous and progressive disease that is not yet well understood. As it is quite rare and produces symptoms very similar to other heart diseases, it is often misdiagnosed.

Amyloidosis refers to a group of diseases, caused by deposits of abnormal proteins (amyloid) that affect one or more organ systems in the body. Buildup of amyloid in the heart is known as cardiac amyloidosis, and whether it occurs solely in the heart or in conjunction with other organs, it is the presence of amyloidosis in the heart that determines the severity and outcome of the disease and its treatments.

To promote effective and efficient treatment and a better understanding of the disease among physicians and patients, Brigham and Women’s Hospital established the multidisciplinary Cardiac Amyloidosis Program that draws upon the expertise of some of the country’s leading cardiology specialists. The program is led by noted cardiac amyloidosis expert Rodney H. Falk, MD, who, in the video below, discusses the importance of early diagnosis and the progress being made in caring for patients with the disease.

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