Think Pink – Schedule Your Screening Mammogram

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital October 20, 2015

Stop by Brigham and Women’s/Mass General Health Center, next to Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, before or after your mammogram, to view pink gear worn by members of the New England Patriots.

Stop by Brigham and Women’s/Mass General Health Center, next to Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, before or after your mammogram to view pink gear worn by members of the New England Patriots.

If you’ve watched a professional football game over the last few weeks, you’ve probably noticed players sporting pink socks, wristbands, and other items of pink clothing.

Throughout October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, NFL players, coaches, and referees are wearing pink game apparel to remind women and their loved ones about the importance of regular breast cancer screening via mammography. Early detection of breast cancer improves a woman’s treatment outcomes.

Screening mammography is indicated for a woman who has no symptoms, such as a mass in the breast or nipple discharge. The American College of Radiology recommends that asymptomatic women begin screening mammography beginning at age 40, with yearly examinations recommended thereafter.

Digital 3-D mammography, a new advanced imaging technology for detecting breast cancer, offers a clearer, more complete three-dimensional view of a woman’s breast tissue compared with traditional mammography, which creates two-dimensional images. This technology enables radiologists to see tumors when they are very small and differentiate them  from abnormalities that look like tumors, but  are often overlapping breast tissue. When radiologists are able to identify malignant tumors at an early stage, it usually means that the cancer has been found before it has spread to other parts of the body. Read More »

Getting the Whole Picture: 3-D Mammography Improves Breast Cancer Detection

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital May 28, 2013

3-D mammography, compared to traditional imaging, offers a clearer view of breast tissue.

Why are radiologists so enthusiastic about 3-D mammography (digital breast tomosynthesis), a new imaging technology for diagnosing breast cancer?

The simple answer is that it could help save thousands of lives each year.

3-D mammography, compared to traditional two-dimensional imaging, offers a clearer view of the dense tissue within a woman’s breast. Specifically, it enables radiologists to see tumors when they are very small and differentiate them from abnormalities that look like tumors but are usually benign, such as micro-calcifications (calcium deposits) or cysts. When radiologists are able to identify malignant tumors at this early stage, it usually means that the cancer has been found before it has spread to other parts of the body.

Read More »