A New Year – A Healthier You!

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital December 21, 2016

A New Year’s resolution to increase exercise can go a long way for your bones, joints, and many other aspects of your health. Starting a plan by setting small achievable goals every six-to-eight weeks is a great way to track your progress throughout the year. You should never increase your mileage or minutes spent exercising more than 10 percent per week.

Authors: Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, and Emily Brook, a research assistant in the Women’s Sports Medicine Program.

With a new year right around the corner, many of us are thinking about a New Year’s resolution. One of the most common New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, exercise more and be healthy! Bones and joints appreciate weight loss, because for every pound you lose, pressure is taken off of your hip, knee, and ankle joints. However, losing weight and transitioning to a healthy lifestyle takes time, and many people who do too much, too soon, wind up with an overuse injury in the first 8-12 weeks of the year.

If you are thinking about weight loss or increasing your exercise as a New Year’s resolution, follow these simple tips to start your year off right and be on your way to an injury-free healthier lifestyle. Read More »

Avoiding Injuries while Being Active

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital August 25, 2016

During the late summer and fall, popular outdoor activities include tennis, golf, and running. In this blog roundup, Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), offers some helpful advice on ways to avoid common injuries while enjoying these activities.

 

Women's Tennis doublesUnderstanding and Preventing Tennis Injuries

Tennis has many proven health benefits, such as improving cardiovascular fitness, balance, motor control, hand-eye coordination, bone strength, and flexibility. Learn how to avoid some of the most common tennis injuries, whether you’re a pro or a beginner.

 

 


golf shot manGolf Injuries – How to Avoid the Rough

Golf is a terrific way to enjoy the outdoors and stay active, especially if you choose to walk the course. On average, a golfer playing 18 holes on foot will walk anywhere from three to six miles. Read our tips on the prevention of common golf injuries and how to recognize the signs of injury.

 

 

 

female athleteAvoiding Bumps in the Road while Training for a Road Race

In order to get ready for a long-distance running event, every runner should have a training plan that gradually builds intensity as race day approaches. This post explains some of the most common running overuse injuries and what you should do to get back on track.

 

 

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Training for a Road Race: How to Avoid Bumps in the Road

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 9, 2016

You also should add stretching to your daily routine, making sure your calves and Achilles tendons aren’t tight.

Runners should add stretching to their daily routine, making sure their calves and Achilles tendons aren’t tight.

Authors: Elizabeth G. Matzkin, MD, is Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, and Emily Brook is a research assistant in the Women’s Sports Medicine Program.

Every runner should have a training plan that gradually builds intensity as race day approaches. As any runner knows, there are almost always physical setbacks during training. Some injuries may go away quickly, while others may linger. In this post, we explain some of the most common running overuse injuries and what you should do to get back on track.

Runner’s Knee

What is it and why does it happen?

Also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome, runner’s knee – which can occur in one or both knees – is one of the most common training setbacks. When your thigh muscles are weak, it causes your knee cap (patella) to be slightly displaced and rub against other structures. This can lead to pain around the knee cap during running or walking, grinding or crunching noises as your knee moves, and difficulty going up or down stairs or getting up from a chair.

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3 Common Golf Injuries: How to Avoid the “Rough”

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital May 17, 2016

Golf injuries are common at all levels of play.

Golf injuries are common at all levels of play.

Authors: Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, and Emily Brook, a research assistant in the Women’s Sports Medicine Program.

Golf is a lifetime sport – people of all ages and activity levels can participate. It is a great way to get outside and stay active, especially if you choose to walk the course. On average, a golfer playing 18 holes on foot will walk anywhere from three to six miles. Injuries are common at all levels of play, from first-time golfers to professionals. Before you take your first swing of the season, be sure to check out the tips below on signs, symptoms, and prevention of common golf injuries.

Read More »

Common Tennis Injuries and How to Prevent Them

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital April 5, 2016

Tennis has many proven health benefits. However, injuries can and do occur at all skill levels, from beginners to the pros.

Tennis has many proven health benefits. However, injuries can and do occur at all skill levels, from beginners to the pros.

Today’s post is from Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, and Kimberly Glerum, a research assistant in the Women’s Sports Medicine Program.

With warmer weather and sunny days around the corner, many of us will be eager to get outside and hit the tennis courts this spring and summer. Often known as a “lifetime” sport, tennis is a great way for people of all ages and levels of athletic ability to stay in shape. Tennis has many proven health benefits, such as improving cardiovascular fitness, balance, motor control, hand-eye coordination, bone strength, and flexibility. However, injuries can and do occur at all skill levels, from beginners to the pros. Below, we describe some of the most common tennis injuries, as well as tips on how to avoid them.

Read More »

Obstacle Course Racing: 3 Things to Know Before You Sign Up

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital February 25, 2016

Obstacle course races seek to push participants’ bodies to the limit while experiencing the outdoors.

Obstacle course races seek to push participants’ bodies to the limit while experiencing the outdoors.

Today’s post is from Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, and Emily Brook, a research assistant in the Women’s Sports Medicine Program.

There are always new trends and ways to make exercise interesting and fun. One such trend today is obstacle course racing (OCR). The most popular OCR events among novice and intermediate athletes currently are the Tough Mudder, Spartan Sprint, and Warrior Dash. These races seek to push participants’ bodies to the limit while experiencing the outdoors. Although there are several long-distance OCR options – including the Tough Mudder – we recommend that novice and intermediate athletes start with a sprint race of about three miles. We also recommend that you check with your doctor to determine whether it would be safe for you to participate in an OCR event.

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Ski and Snowboard Injuries and How to Prevent them

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital January 7, 2016

Downhill skiing and snowboarding are great ways to stay active during the winter months.

Downhill skiing and snowboarding are great ways to stay active during the winter months.

Authors: Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics; Nicole Durand PT, DPT, a physical therapist in the Rehabilitation Department at Brigham and Women’s/Mass General Health Care Center; and Emily Brook, BA, a research assistant in the BWH Women’s Sports Medicine Program.

Downhill skiing and snowboarding are great ways to stay active during the winter months. However, it is important to recognize that injuries can happen, regardless of your skill level. Before you hit the slopes this winter, make sure you are aware of the unexpected things that can happen. As always, see a doctor if you suspect an injury. Below, we describe some of the most common injuries associated with skiing and snowboarding and provide tips to prevent injuries.

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Understanding and Preventing Overuse Injuries

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital April 23, 2015

Overuse injuries can be extremely difficult to treat, and their effects tend to linger.

Today’s post comes from Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, and Dr. Matthew Riedel, an orthopedic resident at BWH.

With warmer weather headed our way and more people running more frequently, we would like to focus this segment of our running/marathon blog series on overuse injuries and how to avoid them. As opposed to acute injuries, which happen suddenly, overuse injuries are more subtle and occur as a result of repetitive microtrauma (small injuries) to the musculoskeletal system. Given the subtle and chronic nature of these injuries, they can be extremely difficult to treat and their effects tend to linger and can be bothersome for weeks to months. These injuries occur when there is an imbalance in your body’s remodeling process – the natural breakdown and rebuilding of tissues that occurs with exercise and rest. Ramping up your exercise too quickly, not allowing adequate recovery between workouts, or using poor form/technique can lead to these injuries by overly stressing a specific muscle group, tendon, ligament, bone, or joint. Unfortunately, the treatment for these injuries is mainly supportive – greatly scaling back your exercise/training routine or resting the injured body part altogether, using anti-inflammatory medications and ice, and, most importantly, giving yourself time to heal. The good news is that many, if not all, overuse injuries are 100 percent avoidable by listening to your body and following a few simple guidelines.

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Running Tips for Cold and Snowy Weather

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital February 19, 2015

Don’t let the cold weather and snow discourage you from running outside.

During the frigid winter months many runners settle for the treadmill, or even worse, for not running at all. Don’t let the cold weather and snow discourage you from running outside. Winters are beautiful here in Boston!

Here are some cold-weather running tips for staying warm and safe during the winter months.

1. Layering and wearing appropriate clothing is crucial for cold-weather running.

You will want to keep most of your body covered and protected from exposure. Wear synthetic, sweat-wicking clothing as your innermost layer. Wearing moisture-wicking clothing as the fabric closest to your skin keeps your body dry and makes your clothes a better insulator. Make sure you are not wearing cotton underwear or socks. Lycra or polypropylene running tights are optimal for the waist down. Your outermost layer should be wind-resistant and waterproof if it is raining or snowing out. GORE-TEX® is a breathable material and is ideal for your outermost layer. If it is very cold, a fleece liner or a long-sleeve shirt is a good option for a middle layer. Dressing in layers allows you to adapt to the weather during your run. A significant amount of body heat can be lost through the head, so make sure you wear a hat. A balaclava or face mask is a good idea when it is extremely cold. Do not forget to wear gloves as well! After your run, it is important to quickly change into dry and warm clothes.

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Five Tips for a Healthy Rotator Cuff

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital December 9, 2014

Throwing athletes use their shoulders aggressively and are at increased risk of rotator cuff damage.

Contributor: Elizabeth G. Matzkin, MD, is Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics.

The rotator cuff is composed of four muscles surrounding the shoulder joint. They act like cables on a suspension bridge to coordinate movement of the shoulder in space and to enhance the stability of the shoulder joint. Injury to this important group of muscles can cause pain and limit shoulder function. Non-sports activities can cause such injuries, but throwing athletes use their shoulders aggressively and are at increased risk of rotator cuff damage.

Simple everyday measures, however, can significantly improve the health of the rotator cuff and prevent future injuries. Dr. Elizabeth G. Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at BWH and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, offers patients the following five simple tips for maintaining a healthy rotator cuff.

Read More »