Advancing the Treatment of Malignant Gliomas

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital May 14, 2015

Gliomas can arise anywhere in the brain.

Malignant gliomas are a set of tumors that can arise anywhere in the brain. Tumor cells divide to create a mass, as well as infiltrate into normal brain tissue. The current standard of treatment for malignant gliomas is surgery to remove as much of the tumor as possible, often followed by chemotherapy and radiation. There are, however, many new treatment approaches being evaluated for malignant gliomas.

In the following video, Dr. E. Antonio Chiocca, Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery and Co-Director of the Institute for the Neurosciences at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, describes a promising new approach called oncolytic virotherapy. This involves the use of common viruses to treat malignant gliomas. Studies of the herpes simplex virus type 1 have shown that the virus invades tumor cells and destroys them, while also stimulating the immune system to create a vaccine-like effect against the tumor.

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Patient Turned Researcher Helps Advance Understanding of Brain Tumors

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital April 13, 2015

Steven Keating (right) holds a 3-D printed model of his brain.

Interested in seeing images of his brain, Steven Keating, currently a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab, volunteered for a research study while attending school in Canada in 2007. When researchers returned his brain scans, they delivered some startling news.

“The researchers told me I had an abnormality near the smell center in my brain, but that lots of people have abnormalities and I shouldn’t be alarmed,” says Steven. However, as a precaution, researchers advised Steven to get his brain re-scanned in a few years.

Steven’s next set of brain scans, performed in 2010, showed no changes. But in July 2014, he started smelling a strange vinegar scent for about 30 seconds each day. He immediately had his brain scanned and learned that the strange smell was associated with small seizures due to the presence of a brain tumor called a glioma. Steven’s glioma had grown to the size of a baseball.

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