Adult Brain Tumors: The Latest Research and Treatment

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital May 5, 2016

Patrick Wen, M.D. and David Reardon, M.D. look at a computer with an image of an MRI. Photographed for BWH onclolgy advances.

Patrick Wen, MD, (left) and David Reardon, MD, are exploring new treatment options for adult Contrbrain tumors.

Contributor: David Reardon, MD, is Clinical Director in the Center for Neuro-Oncology at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center.

Historically, brain tumors have been some of the most challenging types of cancers to treat. A protective barrier around the brain – called the “blood-brain barrier” – can prevent cancer treatments from reaching the tumor. Recently, increased interest in immunotherapy has given new hope to overcoming this challenge.

“We know the immune system can get into the brain to fight infections and inflammatory conditions,” says David Reardon, MD, Clinical Director in the Center for Neuro-Oncology at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center. “Our current research is moving forward to a level where we’re critically confirming that these immunotherapy drugs are getting into the brain and making a difference.”

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New Immunotherapy Vaccines Show Promise in Treating Brain Tumors

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital May 7, 2015

Dr. David Reardon

Researchers in the Center for Neuro-Oncology at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center are now launching attacks on glioblastomas from a new angle – by turning the patient’s immune system against the cancer cells. Where targeted chemotherapy uses drugs to disable proteins that cancer cells need to grow, immunotherapy drugs stimulate the patient’s immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells.

Traditional drugs and even targeted chemotherapy agents have had little success in treating glioblastoma – a very aggressive type of brain tumor.

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New Developments in Treating Brain Tumors

Posted by Blog Administrator May 24, 2012

David A. Reardon

David Reardon: "Analysis of tumors means we can recommend clinical trials that offer patients the most promise and hope."

More than 600,000 people in the United States are living with a primary brain tumor – one that begins and stays in the brain – and over 60,000 adults and children will be diagnosed with a brain tumor this year. In recognition of May as Brain Tumor Awareness Month, we asked Dr. David Reardon, clinical director of the Center for Neuro-Oncology at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’sCancerCenter, for the latest advances in brain tumor research and patient care.

Q. What are some of the challenges in treating brain tumors that you’re researching?

A.  For one thing, glioblastomas – the most common and aggressive primary brain tumors – are genetically very complex. The tumor cells are driven by multiple abnormal gene pathways, so we’re starting to use combinations of targeted drugs in “cocktails” that can block several pathways at once.

In addition, glioblastoma cells are adept at developing resistance to chemotherapy. We can now measure some enzymes whose levels predict which patients are more likely to develop resistance to a given drug.

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