Milk Consumption May Delay Osteoarthritis in Women

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 26, 2014

Women who frequently drink fat-free or low-fat milk may delay progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.

The old ads touting that “milk does a body good” have renewed meaning, based on new research from Brigham and Women’s Hospital  that indicates women who frequently drink fat-free or low-fat milk may delay progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Interesting to note is that the same results were not found in the men who participated in the study.

And while you may be thinking that this means other dairy products might have the same benefits, this is not the case. In fact, the study showed that women who ate cheese actually saw an increase in knee OA progression and that yogurt had no impact at all.

So exactly how much milk do you have to drink to see the potential benefit?

“Milk consumption plays an important role in bone health,” explains Brigham and Women’s biostatistician and lead author of the study, Bing Lu, MD, DrPH. “Our study is the largest study to investigate the impact of dairy intake in the progression of knee OA.”

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For Women, a Beer Every Couple of Days Might Help Keep Rheumatoid Arthritis Away

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 18, 2014

A new study suggests that, for women, drinking moderate amounts of beer may reduce future development of rheumatoid arthritis.

If you enjoy the occasional beer, you might be reducing your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.

A new study from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) suggests that, for women, drinking moderate amounts of beer has a positive impact on the development of rheumatoid arthritis – the most common type of chronic arthritis caused by the immune system.

“Long-term, moderate alcohol drinking may reduce future rheumatoid arthritis development,” explains principal investigator Bing Lu, MD, DrPH, of the Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy at BWH. “The study found that moderate use of any form of alcohol reduced the risk by 21 percent, but moderate beer drinking – between two and four per week – cut women’s odds by nearly a third.”

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