Multiple Sclerosis: Can the Microbiome Offer Clues to New Treatments and a Possible Cure?

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital July 5, 2016

In a recent study, BWH researchers discovered that bacteria living in the gut may influence the activity of brain cells involved in controlling inflammation and neurodegeneration – key factors in the development and progression of MS.

BWH researchers have discovered that bacteria living in the gut may influence the activity of brain cells involved in controlling inflammation and neurodegeneration.

Contributor: Francisco Quintana, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. His research aims to outline the mechanisms that control the activity of the immune system, with the ultimate goal of identifying new therapies.

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) are looking to the gut microbiome, a collection of microorganisms that live inside the intestines, for new treatment approaches and a potential cure for multiple sclerosis (MS).

In a recent study, the research team discovered that bacteria living in the gut may influence the activity of brain cells involved in controlling inflammation and neurodegeneration – key factors in the development and progression of MS. The team’s results, published in Nature Medicine, may point to potential therapeutic targets for patients with MS. Previous research has suggested a connection between the gut microbiome and brain inflammation. How the two are linked and how diet may influence this connection, however, has remained largely unknown.

“For the first time, we’ve been able to determine that food has some sort of remote control over central nervous system inflammation,” says Quintana, the senior investigator of the study. “What we eat enables bacteria in our gut to produce small chemicals, some of which are capable of traveling all the way to the brain.” Read More »

Alzheimer’s Disease Research – Targeting Amyloid Beta Protein

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital September 21, 2015

Development of plaques and tangles in the brain lead to the characteristic Alzheimer’s disease symptoms of memory loss and cognitive decline.

Contributor: Dennis Selkoe MD, Co-Director of the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and the Vincent and Stella Coates Professor of Neurologic Diseases in the Department of Neurology at Harvard Medical School.

Long before a person begins to exhibit Alzheimer’s disease symptoms, he or she will build up plaques in the brain composed of the amyloid beta protein. Shortly after the initial development of plaques, tangles, made up of the tau protein, also will build up in the brain. The plaques and tangles together mount up over decades, leading to a short-circuiting of nerve cells in the brain and the characteristic Alzheimer’s disease symptoms of memory loss and cognitive decline.

Studying the Role of Amyloid Beta Protein

Since the 1980s, Dr. Selkoe and his colleagues have been gathering data to support the Amyloid Hypothesis, in which he proposed that Alzheimer’s disease begins with the build-up of amyloid beta protein in “thinking regions” of the brain.

In 1992, Dr. Selkoe and colleagues made a surprising discovery – the amyloid beta protein is made by everyone throughout life. This discovery raised the question – why doesn’t everyone get Alzheimer’s disease? BWH researchers found that certain genetic and environmental factors can make some people susceptible to greater amyloid buildup and the subsequent development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Currently, several pharmaceutical companies are developing treatments which  use antibodies that target amyloid beta protein in the brain. Promising clinical trial results  of these antibodies suggest that an anti-amyloid treatment for Alzheimer’s disease may be available to patients within a few years.Researchers also are studying whether earlier treatment with anti-amyloid antibodies and other agents may help slow or even halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease before patients become symptomatic.

Can Alzheimer’s Disease be Prevented?

The Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer’s (A4) Study is the first prevention trial for Alzheimer’s disease. The A4 Study, created and led by Reisa Sperling, MD, Director of the BWH Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment (CART), is currently enrolling patients at many sites in the U.S., Australia, and Canada. These still cognitively normal subjects at risk for AD will be followed over years to see whether an anti-amyloid antibody can prevent the development of Alzheimer’s disease in patients who show evidence of amyloid beta protein in their brains on a PET scan, but who are not yet experiencing Alzheimer’s disease symptoms.

In the following video, Dr. Selkoe describes progress on research to develop and characterize treatments for Alzheimer’s disease that target the amyloid beta protein:


Related posts:

– Jamie R.

Save

Join the 50 Million Faces Campaign

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 25, 2015

Help inspire hope and drive research to find cures for five of the most complex neurologic diseases of our time.

“Nothing can prepare you for the moment when your mother looks into your eyes and asks you what your name is,” says Amy Erickson. “I lost my mother to Alzheimer’s in 2007, but truth be told, I lost her a little bit at a time for 10 years.”

Amy is one of millions around the world who have faced the devastating effects of neurologic diseases – either through a loved one’s illness or through their own personal experience.

To give Amy and others like her a platform to share their stories, the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) launched the social media campaign 50 Million Faces (#50MillionFaces) in late April.

Read More »