February 14 is National Donor Day, a time to think about the significance of organ, eye, tissue, marrow, platelet, and blood donation. Consider that in the U.S. more than 120,000 are waiting for an organ, 18 people die each day while waiting for an organ, one donor can help save up to eight lives, every two seconds someone needs donated blood, and a single car accident victim can require up to 100 pints of blood. Below are just a few of many stories of how selfless donations have helped to improve or save our patients’ lives.

 

  Kidney Transplant Patient Advocates for Kidney HealthIn the past two decades, BWH kidney transplant recipient Pauleter Stevens has become a devoted advocate for kidney health and disease prevention. A Bermuda native who works for the island’s Department of Health, Pauleter was first diagnosed with kidney failure in 1994, after a strep throat infection spread to her kidneys.

 

 

  Pancreas Transplant – Short Trip to a Big RewardJohn McDermott was sitting at his desk at Boston Children’s Hospital, where he has worked as a pharmacist for more than 40 years, when he received the call in the spring of 2007 to come to BWH for a new pancreas – and become BWH’s first pancreas transplant recipient.

 

 

  Transplantation: A History and Future of FirstsMany transplant milestones have taken place at BWH, including the world’s first successful human organ transplant, a kidney transplanted from one identical twin to another, in 1954. Since this groundbreaking start, our transplant programs have continued to build upon this innovative spirit.

 

 

  A New Heart – Restoring One Life, Inspiring AnotherDespite being born with congenital heart disease, doctors were able to effectively manage Brad’s condition for many years. However, as his condition continued to decline and complications intensified during his early 30s, it became clear that he would need a heart transplant to save his life.

 

 

  Need a Good Reason to Donate Blood?On April 17, 2009, Nathan McDonald, then 26 years old, was riding his motorcycle when a garbage truck pulled in front of him. With little time to react, Nathan slammed into the truck at high speed. With a head injury, a fractured pelvis, and massive blood loss, Nathan wasn’t expected to live. During the first night alone, Nathan received about 60 pints of blood.

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