An Alternative “Approach” to Hip Replacement Surgery

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital January 13, 2017

Dr. Gregory Brick and Dr. John Ready are experienced in using the anterior approach in hip replacements, a technique that has demonstrated reduced length of hospital stay, less risk of dislocation, faster recovery, and less post-operative pain.

Contributors: Dr. Gregory Brick and Dr. John Edward Ready are orthopaedic surgeons in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). Dr. James D. Kang is Chairman of the Department.

Orthopaedic surgeons have several ways of reaching the hip joint during a hip replacement surgery. The traditional technique, known as the “posterior” approach, reaches the hip joint through the buttock muscles. Less commonly used is the “anterior” approach, which makes a small incision at the front of the hip. Only 15 percent of surgeons in the U.S. employ the anterior approach, and few surgeons in Boston use the method.

Currently, the only surgeons in the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency Program to use the anterior approach are Dr. Gregory Brick and Dr. John Edward Ready – orthopaedic surgeons in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at BWH. They use the anterior approach in 95 percent of their hip replacement surgeries.     Read More »

Weight Loss Success in the New Year

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital December 29, 2016

Many people begin a new year with a resolution to lose weight. To help support your goals for 2017, specialists in the Center for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) have compiled resources with information about weight loss.

 

Controlling the Hunger Hormone

Have you ever thought about what makes you feel hungry or full? There are many signals in the body that help to control the amount of food we eat. Ghrelin, which is sometimes called the hunger hormone, is one of these signals. Learn more about this important hormone in this blog post.

 

 

 

Improving Quality of Life after Bariatric Surgery

Weight loss surgery, or bariatric surgery, is about much more than weight loss. In fact, it’s often called metabolic and bariatric surgery because it can lead to an improvement in many health conditions. Find out more about the benefits of weight loss surgery in this blog post.

 

 

Walk from Obesity – Raising Awareness

In late spring, the Boston Walk from Obesity will begin and end at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital (BWFH) and wind through the beautiful Arnold Arboretum. Funds raised through the event are used to support obesity-related research, education, and awareness programs promoted by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Foundation. Read more about prior events and learn how you can get involved.

 

 

Is Weight Loss Surgery Right for You?

This video features members from the BWH Center for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, including Scott Shikora, MD, Director, Bariatric Nutrition Coordinator Laura Andromalos, MS, RD, LDN, and Bariatric Program Manager Kellene A. Isom, MS, RD, LDN. Viewing our New Patient Information video is the first step in considering whether bariatric surgery makes sense for you.

 

A New Year – A Healthier You!

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital December 21, 2016

A New Year’s resolution to increase exercise can go a long way for your bones, joints, and many other aspects of your health. Starting a plan by setting small achievable goals every six-to-eight weeks is a great way to track your progress throughout the year. You should never increase your mileage or minutes spent exercising more than 10 percent per week.

Authors: Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, and Emily Brook, a research assistant in the Women’s Sports Medicine Program.

With a new year right around the corner, many of us are thinking about a New Year’s resolution. One of the most common New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, exercise more and be healthy! Bones and joints appreciate weight loss, because for every pound you lose, pressure is taken off of your hip, knee, and ankle joints. However, losing weight and transitioning to a healthy lifestyle takes time, and many people who do too much, too soon, wind up with an overuse injury in the first 8-12 weeks of the year.

If you are thinking about weight loss or increasing your exercise as a New Year’s resolution, follow these simple tips to start your year off right and be on your way to an injury-free healthier lifestyle. Read More »

Making a New Robotic Prosthesis a Reality

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital November 23, 2016

ewing-blog-post

 

Two years ago, Jim Ewing fell nearly 50 feet from a cliff while rock climbing. The injuries he sustained left him with severe damage to the bones and nerves in his left leg.

This past July, Jim decided to take part in a first-of-its-kind surgical amputation procedure with Dr. Matthew Carty, director of the Lower Extremity Transplant Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. In collaboration with the MIT Media Lab, who created a robotic prosthetic, and funding from the Gillian Reny Stepping Strong Center for Trauma Innovation, Jim is set to embark on a new journey that could enable his brain to interact with a specially made prosthetic.

“In its uninjured state, the human body is a dynamic machine, comprised of many moving parts that function in balance and enable us to do amazing things, like running and dancing, through the coordinated interaction of our brain and our muscles,” Dr. Carty explained in a press conference. “Traditional amputations disrupt this dynamic state. As a result, lower limb amputees lose the ability to finely control the muscles in their residual legs and, more importantly, lose the ability to perceive where their limb is in space without looking at it.” Read More »

Hip-Spine Syndrome: It’s Complicated (and Often Overlooked)

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital November 18, 2016

A patient with hip arthritis may experience hip or groin pain as well as trouble walking, while a patient with lumbar spinal stenosis may have pain down their leg, or neurologic symptoms such as numbness, tingling or weakness.

3d rendered illustration of a man having backache

Hip-spine syndrome is a condition where both hip and spine problems are occurring in tandem.

“Hip-spine syndrome is a distinct syndrome where both hip and spinal problems are occurring together,” said James D. Kang, MD, Chairman of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH).

And yet, because hip and spine disorders have overlapping presentations and symptoms, it can often be challenging for physicians to determine if a patient’s symptoms originate from the hip, spine or both. This can delay diagnosis and treatment, and many patients with hip-spine syndrome have seen several physicians and therapists, or may have undergone various procedures that did not relieve their pain. Read More »

Finding Relief from Pain

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital September 6, 2016

Among the many reasons why patients go to see a doctor, pain is often a primary complaint. Whether it is acute or chronic, pain can be debilitating. In recognition of Pain Awareness Month, we have compiled some of our blog posts featuring ways to address pain.

 

PainInnovations in Chronic Pain Management

Treating chronic pain often requires different approaches than those used for acute pain. In this post, Dr. Edgar L. Ross, Director of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Pain Management Center, talks about the importance of playing an active role in your treatment plan and the benefits of having a multidisciplinary, collaborative care team that specializes in pain management.

 

 

 

Senior African descent woman grabs lower back in painTips on Managing Back Pain

Managing back pain can be challenging because it is often non-specific and may be the result of many different conditions. In this post, Dr. Jason Yong, an anesthesiologist and pain management specialist in the Comprehensive Spine Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), offers some guidance for people suffering from back pain.

 

 

 

Hip painYoung and Active? Don’t Ignore Hip Pain.

 Many young and active adults who experience hip pain during exercise attribute the discomfort to overdoing it during a workout. In this post, Dr. Scott Martin, an orthopedic specialist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains why it is important to be evaluated for a condition called femoroacetabular impingement if you are young and experiencing repeat hip pain, stiffness, or a catching sensation in the hip during movement.

 

 

gel pack on kneeTreating Injury and Pain: Ice or Heat?

Often when someone gets injured or feels pain, they wonder whether to treat it with cold or heat. This post by Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, offers a few simple guidelines to help you determine which approach to take.

 

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Planning for a Safe and Healthy Summer

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 30, 2016

Summer has finally arrived and many of us are busy planning celebrations, barbecues, and outdoor activities.  Follow these tips from our experts at Brigham and Women’s Hospital to have a healthy and safe summer.


Summer-3Deceptively Dangerous – Avoiding Burn Injuries from Sparklers

Sparklers can cause serious injury because they can burn at up to 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit.  Fireworks are banned in Massachusetts, but you may be traveling to a state where sparklers and other fireworks are allowed. Learn how to avoid injuries and treat burns from sparklers.

 

Summer-2Grilling Food Safely

Use a  thermometer to determine if food has been cooked to the correct temperature. To kill bacteria, hamburgers should be cooked to 160 degrees Fahrenheit, ground poultry to 165 degrees, and poultry parts to 180 degrees. Follow these tips and more to safely prepare foods at your next barbecue.

 

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Training for a Road Race: How to Avoid Bumps in the Road

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital June 9, 2016

You also should add stretching to your daily routine, making sure your calves and Achilles tendons aren’t tight.

Runners should add stretching to their daily routine, making sure their calves and Achilles tendons aren’t tight.

Authors: Elizabeth G. Matzkin, MD, is Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, and Emily Brook is a research assistant in the Women’s Sports Medicine Program.

Every runner should have a training plan that gradually builds intensity as race day approaches. As any runner knows, there are almost always physical setbacks during training. Some injuries may go away quickly, while others may linger. In this post, we explain some of the most common running overuse injuries and what you should do to get back on track.

Runner’s Knee

What is it and why does it happen?

Also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome, runner’s knee – which can occur in one or both knees – is one of the most common training setbacks. When your thigh muscles are weak, it causes your knee cap (patella) to be slightly displaced and rub against other structures. This can lead to pain around the knee cap during running or walking, grinding or crunching noises as your knee moves, and difficulty going up or down stairs or getting up from a chair.

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3 Common Golf Injuries: How to Avoid the “Rough”

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital May 17, 2016

Golf injuries are common at all levels of play.

Golf injuries are common at all levels of play.

Authors: Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, and Emily Brook, a research assistant in the Women’s Sports Medicine Program.

Golf is a lifetime sport – people of all ages and activity levels can participate. It is a great way to get outside and stay active, especially if you choose to walk the course. On average, a golfer playing 18 holes on foot will walk anywhere from three to six miles. Injuries are common at all levels of play, from first-time golfers to professionals. Before you take your first swing of the season, be sure to check out the tips below on signs, symptoms, and prevention of common golf injuries.

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Common Tennis Injuries and How to Prevent Them

Posted by Brigham and Women's Hospital April 5, 2016

Tennis has many proven health benefits. However, injuries can and do occur at all skill levels, from beginners to the pros.

Tennis has many proven health benefits. However, injuries can and do occur at all skill levels, from beginners to the pros.

Today’s post is from Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, Surgical Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Team Physician for Stonehill College Athletics, and Kimberly Glerum, a research assistant in the Women’s Sports Medicine Program.

With warmer weather and sunny days around the corner, many of us will be eager to get outside and hit the tennis courts this spring and summer. Often known as a “lifetime” sport, tennis is a great way for people of all ages and levels of athletic ability to stay in shape. Tennis has many proven health benefits, such as improving cardiovascular fitness, balance, motor control, hand-eye coordination, bone strength, and flexibility. However, injuries can and do occur at all skill levels, from beginners to the pros. Below, we describe some of the most common tennis injuries, as well as tips on how to avoid them.

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