The Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center research team is committed to finding better ways to manage MS.

There are approximately 400,000 people in the United States with multiple sclerosis. Worldwide, the number jumps to more than 2.1 million people. Rather than a one-size-fits-all approach to treating the millions with multiple sclerosis, what if doctors could categorize patients to create more personalized treatments? A new study by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) may one day make this idea a reality in the fight against this debilitating autoimmune disease.

A research team led by Philip De Jager, MD, PhD, BWH Department of Neurology, senior study author, has found a way to distinguish patients with multiple sclerosis into two meaningful subsets. The ability to categorize patients with multiple sclerosis may open new doors for treatment development.

“Our results suggest that we can divide the multiple sclerosis patient population into groups that have different levels of disease activity,” said De Jager. “These results motivate us to improve these distinctions with further research so that we may reach our goal of identifying the best treatment for each individual who has multiple sclerosis.” Read more on this multiple sclerosis research in U.S. News and World Report.

  • Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, located at BWH, is a leading Center in the area of multiple sclerosis, providing comprehensive patient care, innovative technology, and ongoing clinical research trials.

– JCL

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